IEP student

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Latest post 06-05-2010 10:22 AM by kelliety. 2 replies.
  • 06-04-2010 1:41 AM

    • kelliety
      Consumer
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    • Joined on 06-04-2010
    • NH
    • Posts 2

    IEP student

    Hello,   We have a 16 yr old son who has been diagnosed with specific learning disabilities,   he is in the 10th grade and has always done well within the framework of his annual IEP.   Our son has always done exceptionally well in math, and following recommendations from his 9th grade math teacher,  he was enrolled in a college prep algebra 1 class. The teacher in this class is what I would call a no-nonsense teacher,  very strict and in our eyes,  unaccomodating.     Our son is currently failing this class, with a grade of 63. a passing grade is 65. 

    At our sons annual IEP meeting,  two weeks ago,  we voiced concerns with his struggles in this class, and the teachers response was that she found the boy to be, in her words "lazy". This was the first time we have ever heard anything of the sorts from anyone who has ever had interraction with our son, we find the truth to be just the opposite,  he has always been an extremely hard worker, and every comment on every report card or progress report has always said just that.

    A few days after the IEP meeting,  we got his progress report for the semester,  and it showed that he has done fairly well in the class,  except for the fact that there were 9 zero's from missed homework.  We questioned our son about it,  and he said he didnt understand it,  and he tried to turn in some of the assignments late, but the teacher refused to accept them.  His IEP states "academic general accomodation - extended time to complete assignments."    I contacted the teacher,  who told me her policy is to not accept any late homework,  and that was explained in the "course syllabus" that was signed by my wife at the beginning of the semester.   I then contacted the SpEd case manager with the situation and my concerns and she told us we should speak with the teacher and try to work out a resolution.  We again emailed the teacher who today told us that before she considers the matter,  that our son should as she said "advocate for himself",  and speak with her and "show his desire and commitment to make up his work, against her policy".   

    We are quite puzzled by all of this,  and have a meeting next week with his IEP team to discuss this,  but I am wondering if I have a right to demand that he make up his work  as he should be given extended time to complete assignments,  and she refused to accept them,  or am I misinterpreting what is written on the IEP. 

    I am quite insulted with the very condescending tone of the teachers email,  and the fact that she feels her course syllabus takes precedence over an IEP just amazes us.

  • 06-04-2010 9:28 AM In reply to

    • Drew
      Consumer
    • Top 10 Contributor
    • Joined on 03-30-2000
    • PA
    • Posts 48,978

    Re: IEP student

    Laymans take--and a few IEP's under my belt and a few due process hearings as well:

    The issue really boils down to what is written in the current IEP--

    Usually schools try to write pure bull into IEPs and most parents don't know otherwise--BUT if the IEP has words to effect that child needs additional time as you post then that is the relevant scorecard---

    The teacher is flat out professionally out to lunch --the child need not advocate for himself--he already has--by the precise rules of the game--and that's the IEP

    I think there is NO resolution to address in your context--the teacher flat out MUST provide the  extended time to complete the assignments.  Her policies simply do NOT matter  in context of IEP.

    Even if the IEP contains absurd stuff --and some around me do,   like-kid gets a 65 merely for showing up and what he earns is  ADDED --that must be followed --and yes that means  kid gets a 95 if he get a 20 on an exam!  Personally I think we need to do away with IEP and NCLB --but for now that is NOT the case and the law says school MUST deliver the IEP!!!

    The more this teacher sounds off with such views the stronger your claims that school willfully violated the IEP!

    Be sure to keep copies and logs of all this dribble for teacher.

    Its NOT you duty to convince teacher to follow the IEP--its management duty to get it done!

    For a teacher to refuse to address an IEP is probably a matter for invoking the disciplinary process--and could be interpreted as willful and persistent  negligence --which is cause to fire a tenured teacher in my state anyway!

    Personally I think you want to be in the Director of Special Eds office Monday morning with  very demanding requests for written answers that day !

    1. Precise response to exactly when the requirement for child to have extra time to complete missing homework will be honored as per IEP

    2. Submit a formal request for a due process hearing if you do not get a written answer by end on day, Monday.

    3. It doesn't make a tinkers dam if school is over, the IEP must be honored--so the teacher canstaty around to accept the homework or wahtever--don't let them cop out by whitewashing missing work--do it, turn it in , and if SOP is that it is graded, teacher MUST grade it!

    4. Personally I think you want to ask Director of special ed  if its his or her practice to condone unprofessional conduct among teacher and just what her or she intends to do about it! (You won't get answers--but let her feel the heat!)

    5. It is extremely expensive for districts to hold formal due process hearings--keep that in mind--either you get solid responses MONDAY or you fire a formal salvo !

    6 Why waste your time to discuss with a team how to cure their failures --and have htem put the be nice squeeze on you of how much we love your son and how hard he tries.

    7. Does not matter if your son is the laziest rock ever to fall off the pile--the IEP is the scorecard!



  • 06-05-2010 10:22 AM In reply to

    • kelliety
      Consumer
    • Not Ranked
    • Joined on 06-04-2010
    • NH
    • Posts 2

    Re: IEP student

    Thank You so much Drew,

     

    Excellent advice,  and very much appreciated.

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