unfair treatment in workplace

Previous | Next
 rated by 0 users
Latest post 02-27-2013 1:38 PM by cbg. 10 replies.
  • 02-26-2013 4:03 AM

    unfair treatment in workplace

    I work for a casino as a supervisor and recently had an incident that related to coupons missing ($2500) so they placed our area on lockdown simply following procedure. I knew the girl in the bank had just added wrong which ended up being just that. During the process i was asked by management to look through my folder. we all carry folders with info pertaining to work, guest info or whatever we may need for our employees. I said sure, they were following policy. They brought it in the main cage area by other employees who saw this taking place which of course created alot of drama and questions for me. Of course things were added wrong we were all free to go. I asked for my folder back and was told no. First of all we purchase our own folders and binders not the company. I dont have any information in there im not supposed to have. No one will answer my questions as to why i cannot have it back. I have had alot of problems with management in the past with favoritism and harrassed--several issues have been brought to HR. I do have copies of notes and several things i have brought to HR but again nothing i am not supposed to have. I have not been told i am under investigation and no one will answer any of my questions. They have had it for 3 days now. I cant help but think i am being set up. I was free to go after everything was found but denied my belongings back--isnt this against my rights?  How can they keep things i need to do my job with?

  • 02-26-2013 8:39 AM In reply to

    • Drew
      Consumer
    • Top 10 Contributor
    • Joined on 03-30-2000
    • PA
    • Posts 49,519

    Re: unfair treatment in workplace

    You may well be being set up  but thats not the way to play your cards as I see them -IF you are required to have a folder as part of your job---go get a new one and have it on your person as required.

    Unless you are covered by a CBA/union  if you make a pest of yourself you are writing a ticket to be shown the door --and if you are given the door for some violation of company rules such as repeated failure to have a folder--you might find yourself w/o UC as well.



  • 02-26-2013 10:40 AM In reply to

    Re: unfair treatment in workplace

    frustrated73:
    No one will answer my questions as to why i cannot have it back

    They don't have to. They are the bosses, you are the worker.

    frustrated73:
    I have had alot of problems with management in the past with favoritism and harrassed--several issues have been brought to HR.

    Bringing issues to HR is the kiss of death. HR works for the bosses not the workers (though HR people tend to deny that).

    frustrated73:
    I do have copies of notes and several things i have brought to HR
     Do you have duplicates at home? If not, from now on make duplicates that you keep separately.
    frustrated73:
    I have not been told i am under investigation and no one will answer any of my questions. They have had it for 3 days now. I cant help but think i am being set up

    That would be my guess.

    frustrated73:
    I was free to go after everything was found but denied my belongings back--isnt this against my rights? 

    Sure.

    But they'll get away with it anyway.

    What would you do, call the police and report your stuff stolen by your boss? That'll result in getting canned.

    frustrated73:
    How can they keep things i need to do my job with?

    I agree with Drew. If you want to keep your job, get another folder and reproduce whatever you can that you need and keep a low profile till it blows over.

    Otherwise, start looking for another job. Sounds like you've got real problems on this one.

    • The right of the people 
    • to keep and bear arms,
    • shall not be infringed.
  • 02-27-2013 10:42 AM In reply to

    • cbg
      Consumer
    • Top 25 Contributor
    • Joined on 12-21-2000
    • MA
    • Posts 6,830

    Re: unfair treatment in workplace

    HR works for the bosses not the workers (though HR people tend to deny that).

    Of course we do. That's because you're dead wrong. HR staff are employees too - why would we go out of our way to do detriment to ourselves?

    HR does not "work for" either managment or workers. HR is there to see that the laws are followed and that company policies, or exceptions thereto, do not violate any laws. HR does not have the power that you grant them; we don't have the final say in what policies exist or when to make exceptions or even who to hire and fire. Often managment makes decisions over our protests, and we get used as the boogey man by managers who don't want to do their jobs.

    But I've said all this before, and you'd rather believe that HR is an all-powerful villain who conives to fire employees for no reason other than that they can.


    So, carry on. Just don't expect me to stay quiet when you vilify my profession.

  • 02-27-2013 10:56 AM In reply to

    Re: unfair treatment in workplace

    cbg:
    you'd rather believe that HR is an all-powerful villain who conives to fire employees for no reason other than that they can.

    Actually, I don't believe that.

    On the contrary, HR is powerless. In your own words:

    cbg:
    HR does not have the power that you grant them; we don't have the final say in what policies exist or when to make exceptions or even who to hire and fire. Often managment makes decisions over our protests,

    What I do believe, and have written, is that bringing complaints to HR is a fool's errand.

    • The right of the people 
    • to keep and bear arms,
    • shall not be infringed.
  • 02-27-2013 11:00 AM In reply to

    • FallenM
      Consumer
    • Top 500 Contributor
    • Joined on 02-22-2013
    • DC
    • Posts 96

    Re: unfair treatment in workplace

    cbg, I think in a perfect world your position is correct.  As a practical matter, it's kinda not.  Whereas it may be true for you, that doesn't mean it's true as a general rule.  ... the same way that most lawyers take great offense at the notion that they are no more ethical/good at their work than any other segment of the human population (and indeed one can point to a distinct lack of integrity in all but a minority, depending on what motivates them).  This whereas I having spent 25 years in the world of law know damn well that many personality disordered-types (narcissism for one) tend to be drawn to the law and usually to specific areas of practice (e.g., trial law), just as those types are drawn to the world of entertainment.  (There is a reason, after all, that most politicians start out as lawyers ... and it's not because their primary goal is to make law, but to have folks court their favor and wield influence over others.)

    "HR does not "work for" either managment or workers."

    Huh?  Then please define "work for".

    "HR is there to see that the laws are followed and that company policies, or exceptions thereto, do not violate any laws."

    While a component of human resources positions may be just so, regulatory compliance cannot be said to be the sole or primary function.  (If true, then HR jobs would literally be a revolving door in most places, because integrity would demand that people not work in a firm where laws are routinely overlooked or flouted for the sake of expedience or benefit to the company.)

    "... we don't have the final say in what policies exist or when to make exceptions or even who to hire and fire."

    As to the first part, possibly true (depending on the place); as to the second, it depends on what powers are conferred upon them.

    "Often managment makes decisions over our protests..."

    While this may be true in your case, I think it's better not to state as though a general rule.

    "... and we get used as the boogey man by managers who don't want to do their jobs."

    In general, agreed.

  • 02-27-2013 11:42 AM In reply to

    Re: unfair treatment in workplace

    frustrated73:
    During the process i was asked by management to look through my folder. we all carry folders with info pertaining to work, guest info or whatever we may need for our employees.

    Let me put a different spin on this.  Despite the fact that you bought the binder (what did that cost $4.99 at most?) the contents belong to the employer because it contains proprietary information as to how they run their business. 

    frustrated73:
    I dont have any information in there im not supposed to have.

    IF you are still an employee.  If there intent is that they are going to fire you the last thing any employer wants is a former employee (even one leaving voluntarily let alone a potentially disgruntled fired employee) having proprietary information in their possession.  They can easily take it to a competitor at a great risk to the former employer.  It is one reason when employees resign some companies consider it immediate and walk them out:  so they can't take client lists, operational manuals etc. to their new job for an advantage.

    frustrated73:
    I have not been told i am under investigation and no one will answer any of my questions. They have had it for 3 days now.

    If they don't contact you soon then I would file for unemployment.  The employer doesn't have to give you anything in writing or formally say it for you to be terminated.

    frustrated73:
    I was free to go after everything was found but denied my belongings back--isnt this against my rights?  How can they keep things i need to do my job with?

    While the binder may have been purchased by you the information inside is theirs to do with as they please. I wouldn't make a stink over an inexpensive binder.  It isn't worth it.

    "That's just my opinion, then again I might be wrong."  Dennis Miller

     

  • 02-27-2013 12:18 PM In reply to

    Re: unfair treatment in workplace

    FallenM:
    This whereas I having spent 25 years in the world of law know damn well that many personality disordered-types (narcissism for one) tend to be drawn to the law and usually to specific areas of practice (e.g., trial law), just as those types are drawn to the world of entertainment.  (There is a reason, after all, that most politicians start out as lawyers ... and it's not because their primary goal is to make law, but to have folks court their favor and wield influence over others.)

    I disagree with that, although you are entitled to your own opinions, of course. I assume though, that under your view, since you were drawn to work in the legal field for 25 years (though clearly not as a lawyer) that you, too, are afflicted by some personality disorder? What disorder would that be?

    These kinds of gross generalizations of any profession tend to be wildly inaccurate and are offensive for that reason. But then some people never really understand that what they see of a small sample of any profession does not logically equate to the entirety of that profession.

  • 02-27-2013 12:40 PM In reply to

    • cbg
      Consumer
    • Top 25 Contributor
    • Joined on 12-21-2000
    • MA
    • Posts 6,830

    Re: unfair treatment in workplace

    Work for (in this context) = acts as advocate directly for one side or the other, and always the same side

    Of course I know that compliance is not the whole job. My own personal job, at this particular moment in time, is benefits. But the fact remains that A FACTOR, if you prefer, of HR's job is to keep the company compliant. That it is not the whole job does not negate that factor.

  • 02-27-2013 12:44 PM In reply to

    • FallenM
      Consumer
    • Top 500 Contributor
    • Joined on 02-22-2013
    • DC
    • Posts 96

    Re: unfair treatment in workplace

    Be fair:  I wasn't negating regulatory compliance as a factor.  I was simply responding to your post which, purposely or not, seemed to be misleading in terms of focus. 

    I'd say, all in all, like every other segment of human pop, an overriding/primary goal of a given worker is as a general rule to ... keep the job and make dough.  (I know few people who would be doing what they're doing at the place they are doing it ... or working at all ... if they could reasonably see the way clear not to.)  If one can do the "right thing" and accomplish their goals, sometimes they happen (and sometimes they, like any other worker in any profession, could care less about right thing or doing their job correctly).  :)

  • 02-27-2013 1:38 PM In reply to

    • cbg
      Consumer
    • Top 25 Contributor
    • Joined on 12-21-2000
    • MA
    • Posts 6,830

    Re: unfair treatment in workplace

    Fallen, you're fairly new here, so I'll assume you're not aware that this is not the first time this issue has been raised. I appreciate the fact that you appear to understand what I'm talking about. But there's already been a thread in which HR's job was defined fairly completely. I don't see the need to review all the possible aspects of the job when only one aspect of it is being discussed here. For the purpose of this thread, compliance is the aspect which applies. It would only serve to detract from the issue to bring in all the other possible things that the average HR rep does in a day.

Page 1 of 1 (11 items) | RSS

My Community

Community Membership New Users: Search Community