Public Intoxication

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Latest post 11-27-2014 7:36 PM by adjuster jack. 18 replies.
  • 10-28-2014 8:47 PM

    Public Intoxication

    So my girlfriend got arrested the other day for public intoxication.

    Yes, Drew, I should have dumped her months ago:)

    Anyway, my 1st question is this.

    Whatever cash she had (which was actually MY cash I gave her) they converted the cash into a debit card rather than to just put the money into the rest of belongings.

    I looked around online and can't find there to be a law against this.  I suppose they can just take whatever cash they get from you, put it into their bank account, earn interest on it, and then hand you back a debit card when you are released?

    It took them well over an hour to give a card back with what is supposed to be the money on it, and it took less than a minute for them to take the cash and feed it into their machine so they could earn interest on the money.

    I'm just wondering.

    My 2nd question is this.

    They told her she'd have a right to call her lawyer.  They have phones there that use something call the TIP system.  She could not call anyone unless they were to get online and create a phone account for her in her inmate number and put down a credit card.

    When she called, all it says is that it's the TIP system and an inmate would like to speak to you, but you need to create an account and put out money to find out who.  She couldn't make even a single phone call as who would pay and it only would work with a landline phone, not a cell phone.

    Most anyone she knows, including me, only has a cell phone.  And if I don't know who or what I'm talking to, I'm unlikely to open an account and pay money just to find out.

    She never got a single phone call out of the place.  There's no law against that either I suppose?  I could not find one.

    When she was arrested, I told her to just shut up and ask to talk to her lawyer.  She did that but it was impossible for her to contact anyone except a bail bondsman.  That they let you do and seem to be handing out the phone number to everyone in there so they can bond themselves out.  That's the only "free call" she said she could have.

    Comments are appreciated!

    Thanks!

  • 10-28-2014 9:18 PM In reply to

    Re: Public Intoxication

    In theory, the system is designed to make getting arrested as demeaning, humiliating, and inconvenient as possible so that people think about the consequences of what they do before they do it again.

    Nothing illegal happened and your girlfriend's rights weren't violated.

     

    • The right of the people 
    • to keep and bear arms,
    • shall not be infringed.
  • 10-28-2014 9:58 PM In reply to

    Re: Public Intoxication

    superman1:
    Whatever cash she had (which was actually MY cash I gave her) they converted the cash into a debit card rather than to just put the money into the rest of belongings.

    That's done primarily for security purposes. Cash just laying around, even in police station, can easily disappear. If they take the cash and deposit and put the card with her stuff, that's a lot easier to secure. Sure, if the person sits around in jail longer than a day, maybe the jail will make some interest off it, too. Nothing illegal about that, though. 

    superman1:
    They told her she'd have a right to call her lawyer.  They have phones there that use something call the TIP system.  She could not call anyone unless they were to get online and create a phone account for her in her inmate number and put down a credit card.

    I'd be suprised if the local criminal defense attorneys didn't all have landlines set up to take these calls. They are in the business of defending accused criminals, and lots of defendants contact lawyers from jail.

    The law requires that they let her contact an attorney if she wants to. She also has a right to reasonable bail, and the jail is going to want to help get her a bail bondsman to get her out — people in jail who don't need to be there costs the county money. 

    The law doesn't require that she have access to a phone to call anyone else. 

  • 10-29-2014 4:22 AM In reply to

    • DPH
      Consumer
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    Re: Public Intoxication

    superman1:
    I suppose they can just take whatever cash they get from you, put it into their bank account, earn interest on it, and then hand you back a debit card when you are released?

    Not disputing this possibility, but why do you think the county or whoever is earning interest on a prisoner's money?  Assume for a moment that the person in question is arested, has say $42.67 in their possession,  is locked up for 8 hours and then released.  How much interest do you think the agency would realize from this "transaction"? 

    Just saying....

     

     

    "Never argue with stupid people, they will drag you down to their level and then beat you with experience."  -  Mark Twain

     

  • 10-29-2014 4:42 AM In reply to

    Re: Public Intoxication

    Actually, my thought was that it's not just that $42.67 they have in a bank account, they possibly have a grand sum of money in one bank account from everyone that walks through their door.  That could possibly be a decent amount of money.

    I don't know how they do it, but it just seemed likely it was being run like a bank.

    The other issue is if it takes alot of time when you leave for them to process you a debit card, many with only $5 or so to gather are just going to leave it there and the county gets to keep it.

    Anyway, it is what it is.  I have not bailed her out.  This would be the 3rd time I'd have sprung her out and I'm not doing it.  She's in there til her court date which is the end of next month.  Even with a bail bondsman she would need to put up some money I would assume.

  • 10-29-2014 5:11 AM In reply to

    Re: Public Intoxication

    This is just follow up:

    I actually went to watch people attempting to get their money.  I asked questions of those leaving and apparently it's a slow process to get out (The sign in there says up to 4 hours).  Many with just a little bit of cash just wanted to get out of there and left their money.

    Her bail is set at almost $300 for a drunk in public charge.  

    Again there is no question here, just a follow up.

    As you say Jack, Jail isn't meant to be a fun place.

    Hopefully she's got some time to think about what she's been doing with her life.

     

     

  • 10-29-2014 8:56 AM In reply to

    Re: Public Intoxication

    superman1:
    Actually, my thought was that it's not just that $42.67 they have in a bank account, they possibly have a grand sum of money in one bank account from everyone that walks through their door.  That could possibly be a decent amount of money.

    Probably is, but any interest earned likely helps defray the cost of running the place.

    superman1:
    The other issue is if it takes alot of time when you leave for them to process you a debit card, many with only $5 or so to gather are just going to leave it there and the county gets to keep it. I actually went to watch people attempting to get their money.  I asked questions of those leaving and apparently it's a slow process to get out (The sign in there says up to 4 hours).  Many with just a little bit of cash just wanted to get out of there and left their money.

    If a prisoner doesn't want to take the time to retrieve the money, that's the prisoner's problem.

    superman1:
    Anyway, it is what it is.  I have not bailed her out.  This would be the 3rd time I'd have sprung her out and I'm not doing it.

    A wise decision.

    superman1:
     

    Her bail is set at almost $300 for a drunk in public charge.  Even with a bail bondsman she would need to put up some money I would assume.

    Bond fees are paid in advance. Sometimes collateral is required like signing over a car title.

    superman1:

    She's in there til her court date which is the end of next month. Hopefully she's got some time to think about what she's been doing with her life.

    I suspect that she will be calling you to whine and beg for you to bail her out. Addicts can be quite compelling and wear you down after a while. I hope you are strong enough to be able to keep saying no to her. Although it's possible that there are others in her life that can't say no.

     

    • The right of the people 
    • to keep and bear arms,
    • shall not be infringed.
  • 10-29-2014 2:43 PM In reply to

    Re: Public Intoxication

    Jack, I agree.

    The way I see it, jail is actually kind of an inexpensive method of sending her to rehab.

    It also has the added bonus that she cannot just decide after a couple of days to sign herself out and leave.

    They require cash or money order for bail, and it must be done in person.  That means superman is really her only hope until court date.  Everyone she knows says just leave her in there.  That includes both her parents.

    As they say, doing the same thing over and over again hoping you might somehow get a different result is the definition of insanity.  I don't need a crystal ball to know what the result will be if I bail her out.

     

     

  • 10-30-2014 9:02 AM In reply to

    • Drew
      Consumer
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    Re: Public Intoxication

    your crystal ball seems to work darn well...if you enable her habits  in any fashion they sure won't stop and you will soon be back here again. 

    Whether or not she qualifies for any assistance as to rehab programs ..you might seek if such apply.

    Addictions are a disability and she might qualify ......

     



  • 10-30-2014 6:27 PM In reply to

    Re: Public Intoxication

    superman1:

    So my girlfriend got arrested the other day for public intoxication.

     

    Comments are appreciated!

     

    Dear Stupid:

    Time to dump her. Now. 

  • 10-30-2014 8:58 PM In reply to

    Re: Public Intoxication

    Taxagent:
    The law requires that they let her contact an attorney if she wants to. She also has a right to reasonable bail, and the jail is going to want to help get her a bail bondsman to get her out — people in jail who don't need to be there costs the county money

    I visited with her last night, over a terrible little video phone right in the jail itself.  They won't let you visit in person, even if you are on their grounds.  I could barely even hear her as the audio was SO bad.

    She said she had no way to contact anyone without them setting up a TIP system phone account.  I could likely get a lawyer in there for a visit on this video phone, but given her past, is there any point I wonder?  What's one more public intox charge on top of all the rest of her charges?  

    Is there really a difference between 15 and 16 charges when trying to apply for something?  The answer is not going to change to a yes I don't think from 15 to that 16th misdemeanor legal charge is it?

    I don't like it, but I really think I'm doing her a favor by having her sit in there safe and sound.  It's not likely she can rack up any more arrests in the slammer right?  Last I was told, they don't serve cocktails after dinner in jail:)?

     

     

     

  • 10-31-2014 7:20 AM In reply to

    • DPH
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    • Joined on 10-08-2001
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    Re: Public Intoxication

    superman1:
    I don't like it, but I really think I'm doing her a favor by having her sit in there safe and sound.  It's not likely she can rack up any more arrests in the slammer right?

    I personally believe that you are correct and while not impossible, it would likely be difficult to rack up too many additional charges while locked up.  Certainly not ones involving drinking.

    Your GF sounds like she really needs help.  Good luck.

     

     

    "Never argue with stupid people, they will drag you down to their level and then beat you with experience."  -  Mark Twain

     

  • 10-31-2014 8:46 AM In reply to

    Re: Public Intoxication

    superman1:
    Is there really a difference between 15 and 16 charges when trying to apply for something?  The answer is not going to change to a yes I don't think from 15 to that 16th misdemeanor legal charge is it?

    Few employers are going to say “well, hey I would have hired you with 15 misdemeanor convictions but 16 is just one too much for me.” Her problem is that with each new conviction the problem is a continuing one; each new conviction makes her record fresh again, and not in a good way. If she can stop this behavior and have a few years in which she doesn't have more alcohol problems and legal trouble from it she might be able to convince employers and others that she's reformed and worth hiring. She won't get that when the latest conviction is just 6 months old.

  • 10-31-2014 10:52 AM In reply to

    • Kivi
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    Re: Public Intoxication

    I do agree that you probably should not bail her out because it would allow her to escape the consequences of her actions.

    I have a sibling who is in a relationship with someone that might be best described as "in recovery".

    It is always one day at time, but one thing I have noticed that there is no alcohol in their home and they do no serve alcohol when we visit. I respect that decision. Obviously, much easier to live "one day at a time" if the termptation is not "in your face". My sibling is not a teetotaler. He may or may not have an alcoholic drink on occasion when he is not with his companion and away from their residence. I don't know. But, for the sake of the relationship, he has agreed to abide by the decisions needed to make it easier for his companion to truly live "one day at a time".

  • 10-31-2014 7:06 PM In reply to

    Re: Public Intoxication

    Well, as for an update, a shady looking guy, that turned out to be a bail bondsman shows up banging up my door tonight.

    For $31 bucks I can spring the girl he says  However, after asking a few questions, it's obviously not that simple.  First of all, when and if, or wait NO, I mean actually, WHEN, she jumps bail and runs for it, I'm on the hook for her for the full amount and then some!  

    He says I would have to "co sign" for her.  NEVER!  Why don't I just buy your used car driven by an old lady and never been in a wreck and I just believe you on your word?:) LOL?

    Next, when, and if, well, actually, it's just WHEN she screws up again, they will lock her up and throw away the key.  

    If I DID bail her, it's certainly not going to be through a bail bondsman.  That just complicates things.  I'll just drop the $300 bucks and assume I burned that money on the front lawn!

    It's just the same record, and the same song, that keeps playing over and over again.

    I know where she is and it IS terrible!!  However, I don't need to be a fortune teller to know what happens next on any of the moves I might make.  

    It is very sad to watch.  She's sat in there close to a week now.  For public intox.    I know where she is, and I know she's safe there.  She's just going to have to put on her big girl pants and deal with it.

    I feel just sick about it.  But, I think it's the right choice.

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