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DUI - prescription med

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Latest post Thu, Oct 15 2015 11:52 PM by Cicijo. 19 replies.
  • Mon, Oct 12 2015 6:52 PM In reply to

    Re: DUI - prescription med

    Griceok:

    Drew,

    Great advice thank you. The officer came by tonight to give me the police report he failed to give me yesterday. He was almost apologetic. He said he did know I had not been drinking and noted that in the report. Said he would indicate how cooperative I was. The report noted that I told them I had taken medication but it did not say what. He also said this is the first offense and I don't even have a speeding ticket on my record so thought I should be able to get it dropped. I don't trust his judgment and will contact an attorney tomorrow,

     

    all I can say, as a non lawyer, is you are smart not to take your legal advise from a police officer.  

     

  • Tue, Oct 13 2015 8:31 AM In reply to

    Re: DUI - prescription med

    Griceok:
    I also think your claiming I took a "cocktail" of drugs is a stretch. These are prescriptions my dr has ordered.

    I don't understand.  A "cocktail of drugs" is nothing but a combination of multiple drugs.  You described four drugs.

     

    Griceok:
    No time did me mention concerns over the anti-depressants.

    Huh?

     

    Griceok:
    I wasn't trying to get some buzz. . . .

    I didn't figure, given the specifics drugs/types of drugs you said you took.

  • Tue, Oct 13 2015 8:36 AM In reply to

    Re: DUI - prescription med

    superman1:

    Either way, the implication by many people seems to most of the time be the same.  The person was behind the wheel drunk.

    That's just appears to be the assumtion I'm aware of. Perhaps I am wrong, and you are correct.  Perhaps most people assume a DUI means it could be prescription meds I guess?

    While it might be that many people will infer or assume that a person who got a DUI got it because of alcohol, it's not because of anything implied by the terms "DUI," "DWI," and "OWI."  Such inferences/assumptions are probably made because, as a matter of fact, the majority of DUIs result from alcohol, not because of anything implied by the terms.

  • Thu, Oct 15 2015 11:36 PM In reply to

    • Cicijo
      Consumer
    • Not Ranked
    • Joined on Sat, Feb 16 2013
    • IL
    • Posts 60

    Re: DUI - prescription med

    Griceok:

    Good advice and it just dawned on me that I should have went ahead and gone to the emergency room. My blood pressure was high, I took it at home and that's one of the reasons I decided to go. I'm certain my blood test will come back negative.

    I would not be so confident. Ambien is not part of the typical drug panel but they may very well do more thorough testing for law enforcement purposes and if they test for Ambien it will most likely show up. I wouldn't worry about the other medications (anti-depressants don't typically cause impairment) but Ambien is a controlled substance that is known to cause impairment. If your blood test is positive they have to also prove that you were impaired, not only that you had a drug in your system, but the fact that they saw you swirving may be enough to prove that.

    Hopefully, if you get a good lawyer, the charges may be dropped or your lawyer can negotiate a good plea agreement.

     

  • Thu, Oct 15 2015 11:52 PM In reply to

    • Cicijo
      Consumer
    • Not Ranked
    • Joined on Sat, Feb 16 2013
    • IL
    • Posts 60

    Re: DUI - prescription med

    adjuster jack:

    Griceok:
    I just checked any warnings on the ambien bottle and it says "this MAY impair your ability to operate a motor vehicle. Use caution until you become familiar with the medication.

    You're supposed to read those labels before you take the medication.

     

    Having read the label prior doesn't make a difference in regards to driving. It doesn't say that the medication WILL impair you, just that it MAY, and to take caution until you know how the medication affects YOU. The medication in question may not cause impairment in you at all and if that's the case there is no reason not to drive. This is why simply having a certain medication in your system is not enough to convict you of DUI. The prosecutor has to also prove that you were in fact impaired too.

     

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