Help for a Venezuelan woman and son

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Latest post Thu, Dec 22 2016 8:49 AM by Freedom2013. 8 replies.
  • Wed, Dec 21 2016 9:12 AM

    Help for a Venezuelan woman and son

    I have a friend who's here on a tourist visa ending end of January.  She is a safey engineer with a small consulting firm back home, which is currently in complete meltdown economically/politically, and on the brink of a revolution or civil war.  With 700% inflation this year alone, her earnings there are literally meaningless.  Her son of 11 years is back home with her parents.

    How can she realistically, aside from being married, stay in the U.S. and work, and bring her son (he has a tourist visa as well for the U.S.).  As her tourist visa is expiring soon, what are her options here?  If she returns home, she goes into chaos, a very dangerous situation (there's been extreme looting/civil unrest already breaking out), with food and medicine shortages, and cannot return legally for several months under her tourist visa.   It is possible she could go back and get her son and come back in several months, assuming (and hoping) she is not blocked by immigration.  She has a possible case for asylum, but it would not make sense for her to apply for it until she has her son here.  She's very sharp and capable, and just a high quality/value person all around, with English mediocre and improving.  My understanding regarding getting a professional work visa is that it is a lottery (what percentage chance roughly?), not available for over a year, and does not mean she can stay meantime, IF she can find a company to vouch for her and apply for her.  And that a student visa only buys her some time, but very limited work possibilities.

    Trying to help a good person (and her son), in a dangerous and deteriorating situation find their way to a better life.

    Any help/suggestions much appreciated.

  • Wed, Dec 21 2016 3:30 PM In reply to

    Re: Help for a Venezuelan woman and son

    She'd need to meet with an immigration attorney to review her situation and see if there are any options she qualifies for. Asylum will be a tough one to get. The fact that a country is facing a severe economic crisis and possible political unrest are not enough. If it were, practically the whole nation of Venezula would be eligible to come here (and several other nations besides) and obviously that isn’t what our laws are set to do. Realistically, she probably won't find an option that will allow her fast immigration out of Venezula to the U.S.

  • Wed, Dec 21 2016 4:13 PM In reply to

    • Drew
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    Re: Help for a Venezuelan woman and son

    I am not a fan of violation of Visa status and would hope President Trump takes an hard line, that said, for a person not currently in violation of B status it might make sense to follow the rules and go to graduate school F status  or even teach at a university or affialited lower school which is exempt from H1b caps  , apparently some charter schools really stretch it to provide teaching slots for foreign staff .  There are a pile of quirks way beyond me...but I know a major university staffer got some very rapid visa approvals ...because somebody knew the ropes.  ( PS the somebody who knew ropes and got it done, time and time again, was a midlevel nonprofessional who was charged to make those things get done , not a staff attorney   ) And there are some special visa  categories for those with special skills.  

    THere is bit of an anti abuse rule that one cannot violate B status and enroll in school without next returning and applying for F at the nearby American counsalate ..but if one seeks  F before one is in violation of B apparently it can be done in US wo returning home .

    A good portion of folks from one troubled prior French protectorate on Horn of Africa seem to have problems knowing when to return and nearly 100% of graduates of one college seem to have issues ....but I am NOT suggesting one deliberately violate the law and assume zero consequences if it is noticed. 

    The US public education k-12' is hyper liberal to avoid much of,anything as an impediment  as to enrollment of students on B or F or derivative status and by virtue of Supreme Court decision some 35 years  ago, " plyler "  youngester of undocumented or illegal entry status must be educated and no questions asked about status . 

     



  • Wed, Dec 21 2016 4:37 PM In reply to

    • Drew
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    Re: Help for a Venezuelan woman and son

    Yes in theory a youngster grade 4,5,6 whatever would be barred to attend us public school if they entered on B or F...while a youngster who entered improperly must be admitted ...but the last time I heard of B denial , the crazies came out in force and threatened to bar the school from athletic completion. So you know,what happened next in IL. ( plus defund the school )! 



  • Wed, Dec 21 2016 8:53 PM In reply to

    Re: Help for a Venezuelan woman and son

    If getting a job teaching at a Charter school puts her on a faster track, that would be great, though that will take some looking into and her English skills are mediocre at this point (nor do I know how her 5 year engineering degree translates).  But it's worth a look.

  • Wed, Dec 21 2016 9:28 PM In reply to

    Re: Help for a Venezuelan woman and son

    English as her second language and that skill being mediocre at best is going to make her a very unattractive H1B visa applicant.  Those visas are very hard to come by and typically require at minimum a Master's degree if not a PhD.  Even then unless she is in the high demand computer sector most employers won't pay the huge cost of the visa sponsorship.

    Despite Drew's gibberish she is not likely to get a job teaching grade school kids even in a charter school with poor English skills.

    Your friend REALLY needs to consult an immigraiton attorney to find out what steps to take to relocate here with a minor child to be sure that all the steps are followed to ensure success.

    "That's just my opinion, then again I might be wrong."  Dennis Miller

     

  • Thu, Dec 22 2016 5:34 AM In reply to

    • Drew
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    Re: Help for a Venezuelan woman and son

    Gibberish or not, schools are one of the end runs to H1b caps ..not every charter fits, they must have  an agreement with a college  /university ..what ever  that means ...( locally the college supplies paid " volunteer"  student workers by agreement to some schools. ) and in some states some or more of the teachers need not be certified teachers  and colleges have a very free hand as to,who teaches .  And I don't think there s a cap on F visas, over 1 million a year for students .

    I ' m just suggesting that if I were desperate to find a legal fox hole that teaching or student or combinations are some of the places I'd be checking by today.    And Spanish is rather adaptable in ESL circles ....Many a state has " emergency" teacher certification  routes to fill supposedly hard to find skills . And in my state you don't even need a degree for every emergency certificate .  

    ALL she needs is to find one legal fox hole darn soon 

     



  • Thu, Dec 22 2016 7:24 AM In reply to

    Re: Help for a Venezuelan woman and son

    I understand her plight and she has my sympathy. I hope her son is ok. I would love to donate to a cause that will help families there that need food do you know any? It's my understanding food boxes there are even hard to send and not guaranteed to get to the fa,ilies that need them. Is she able to send food and aid to her son and parents?

    If you know of any aid organizations present in Venezuela please let me know. Good luck

  • Thu, Dec 22 2016 8:49 AM In reply to

    Re: Help for a Venezuelan woman and son

    At this point her son is doing ok, but food and medicine shortages, coupled with a recent announcemnet to make the $100 bill valueless due to hyperinflation, is making people act desperately, and it's probablly going to get worse.  A little while ago her cousin got abducted--- the family received a phone call for cash demand, and when they couldn't come up with it they agreed on a different amount with the guarantee that he would receive a stab wound for every dollar they were short.  He was returned, severely beaten but alive.  Sometimes they are not so lucky.  I will ask her about charity food sources---i suspect much gets stolen before it gets to destination. 

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