New MRI-what does it mean?

Previous | Next
 rated by 0 users
Latest post 05-23-2007 3:52 PM by headnhome. 2 replies.
  • 05-23-2007 12:25 AM

    Question [=?] New MRI-what does it mean?

    There is loss of the normal cervical lordosis with straightening of the cervical spine. Vertebral body alignment and height are maintained. There are two hemangiomas within T2. Marrow signal is otherwise normal.

    c3-4 minimal spondylosis and uncovertebral hypertrophy mildly narrow the right neural foramen. Let neural formamen is normal.

    C5-6 A broad-basedposterior protrusion, slightly to the left of midline indents the tehcal sac and mildly flattens the left ventral cord. CSF is preserved posterior to the cord and there is no significant spinal stenosis. Additionally, there is narrowing of the right neural foraman. It is difficult to ascertain if this is related to a disc protrusion or is realated to hypertrophy, but there is suspicion that there may be a small protusion at this level. The left neural foramen is normal.

    Visualized paraspinous musculature appears normal. There is a cyst within the mediastium on the right adjacent to the esophagus. This is probably a congenital neural enteric cyst.
  • 05-23-2007 10:15 AM In reply to

    Feedback [*=*] New MRI-what does it mean?

    There is loss of the normal cervical lordosis with straightening of the cervical spine.

    The neck is straight. Could be normal.
    Could be due to muscle spasms. Also called a military neck. You see it in soldiers standing at rigid attention.

    Vertebral body alignment and height are maintained.

    The vertebrae are in good alignment and their height is ok, no evidence of a fracture or partial vertebrae or any deformity.

    There are two hemangiomas within T2.

    Hemangiomas are extra blood vessels usually benign. In the skin they are called birth marks. They show on xray and MRI when in the bones.

    C3-4 minimal spondylosis and uncovertebral hypertrophy mildly narrowing the right neural foramen. Left neural foramen is normal.

    Spondylosis are degenerative changes that just occur. There is a part of the vertebrae call the uncinate. It projects upward or downward and sometime is a little larger than normal (hypertrophied). The two uncinate form the opening (the foramen) for the nerves to exit the spinal cord. The one on the right is a little smaller than expected. The one on the left is ok.

    C5-6, a broad-based posterior protrusion, slight to th left of midline idents the thecal sac and mildly flattens the left ventral cord.

    Disc bulging to the left on the back of the spine, the thecal sac is the sheath surrounding the spinal cord. The disc indents into the sheath and causes the back (ventral) part of the spinal cord to be flat.

    CSF is preserved posterior to the ords and there is no significant spineal stenosis.

    The spinal fluid (CSF) flows around the spinal cord as it is suppose to. The spinal canal is not narrow (stenosed).

    There is narrowing of the right neural foramen. It is difficult to ascertain if this is related to a disc protrusion or is related to hypertrophy, there is suspecison that there may be a small protusion at this Level.

    The opening where the C5 nerve exits is a little small. The reason does not show well on the MRI. Could be disc protrusion or long uncinate. Based on experience, the radiologists best guess is a protrusion. (Remember radiology is not a precise science.)

    The left neural foramen is normal.

    The opening where the nerves exit is ok.

    Visualized paraspinaous musculature appears normal.

    The muscles that attach to and support the spine are ok.

    There is a cyst within the mediastinum on the right adjacent to the esophagus. This is probably a congenital neural enteric cyst.

    The mediastinum is the space near the lungs, there is a small cyst in the space and to the right of esophagus. Probably born with it (congenital). Probably neural, filled with nerve tissue. Sort of common at this location.

    You noted this was a new MRI, was there a prior one for the radiologist to compare?

    I'm not a medical doctor so I'm not a radiologist. My best guess is less precise than the radiologist best guess, It appears you has some type of injury to the neck. You probably have muscle spasms and guarding. Maybe a car accident or pulled a muscle lifting something?

    Close?

  • 05-23-2007 3:52 PM In reply to

    re: New MRI-what does it mean?

    Allen, what a great response thank you for helping me read it. The terminology used is very difficult to read even for the educated.

    My accident occurred when I my chair rolled out from under me. What a stupid mistake on my part. I'll never sit again without grabbing my chair with 2 hands.

    Thanks again! I really appreciate your help.
Page 1 of 1 (3 items) | RSS

My Community

Community Membership New Users: Search Community