Taxagent, ever heard of the International Indigenous Society

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Latest post 04-09-2012 6:09 PM by Robl90. 17 replies.
  • 12-14-2009 5:49 PM

    Taxagent, ever heard of the International Indigenous Society

    A student claiming to be a member of the International Indigenous Society-Abannaki Murrs Tribal Council-Native American is apply for federal aid and claims he is not required to file a federal tax return, even though he is a union worker.

    I googled it, but can only find a copy of their oath or pledge.  Have you ever heard of this society and is the student's claim true?

    Many thanks,

     

  • 12-14-2009 7:20 PM In reply to

    Re: Taxagent, ever heard of the International Indigenous Soc...

    Never heard of that tribe. My research indicates it's not real—it is certainly not listed in the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) regulation that lists all 564 federally recognized Native American Tribes. The closest thing I found for an Abannaki nation was as part of the Zulu nation in Africa—they are not native Americans and would not get any exemption from tax.

    Native Americans are not exempt from federal income tax unless there is a specific statutory exemption (and those are very few) or a treaty with a specific Native American tribe. Where there are treaties, they only exempt income earned from the reservation, not off-reservation work. Since this appears to be a tribe that is not recongized, that means there is no treaty and no tax exemption other than what the statute provides. His union work would be subject to U.S. tax in any event. It is not exempt by statute nor would a treaty exempt it for work done off a reservation. These kinds of spurious claims of membership in some Native American tribe or that Native Americans are exempt from all tax are made primarily by tax protestors. They are considered to be frivilous and can lead to both civil penalties and criminal prosecution for tax evasion.

    Thus, it seems to me just based on what is here that his claims are less than truthful and are improper attempts to avoid his tax obligations. I wouldn't want someone like that getting student aid paid for by my federal tax dollars. Just my two cents worth.

  • 12-15-2009 1:44 PM In reply to

    • Drew
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    Re: Taxagent, ever heard of the International Indigenous Soc...

    If this is a request for student aid--I'd merely advise student that he need to provide proof of his exemptions and proof of his wages and tell him his application goes into gargage can w/o same.

    Now if you have some darn qutoa or drive to recruit native American Indians--call leaders of any recognized tribe and ask them for help.



  • 12-15-2009 2:23 PM In reply to

    Re: Taxagent, ever heard of the International Indigenous Soc...

    I'm a direct descendant of the Fakawi Indians on my mother's side and the Shmohawk Indians on my father's side.

    Please send me some of that financial aid.

    Thanks.

    • The right of the people 
    • to keep and bear arms,
    • shall not be infringed.
  • 12-15-2009 2:37 PM In reply to

    Thanks to all who replied!

    In 20 years in federal student aid, this is the first time I'd heard of this one!

  • 12-15-2009 5:50 PM In reply to

    Re: Taxagent, ever heard of the International Indigenous Soc...

    The issue here was not that being a member of that tribe would enable him to get preference in federal student aid. The issue is that to get federal student aid, you must submit copies of your federal income tax returns. This student is trying to get around that requirement because he says he doesn't have to file them based on this claim of belonging to some native american tribe. Most such claims are bogus, and given the information provided in the post, it is a pretty good bet that this student's claim is bogus too. Like it or not, if he wants the aid, he'll likely have to file federal tax returns and provide copies of them to the financial aid office.

  • 12-16-2009 4:11 PM In reply to

    • JohnB3
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    Re: Taxagent, ever heard of the International Indigenous Soc...

    Intelligence Report
    Summer 2007


      Black Separatists
    Abannaki Indigenous Nation Members Arrested
        Another fringe black separatist group has come into the crosshairs of law enforcement. Like many others, the Abannaki Indigenous Nation propounds a bizarre ideology that's a mix of pseudo-scientific ideas about white people and groundless theories about being immune to U.S. laws that originated in white supremacist groups.

    In March, police in Trenton, N.J., told The Trentonian that they had encounters with several men claiming to have immunity from U.S. laws. Four were arrested in separate incidents over the course of three days on charges ranging from possession of a controlled substance to displaying fraudulent documentation. The men identified themselves as members of the Abannaki Indigenous Nation, but the group's formal name, according to its website, is the Abannaki Aboriginal Nation of Muurs (such groups commonly use variants of the word "Moor," the ancient name for a dark-skinned North African people, to describe themselves).

    In each incident, the men said they did not recognize U.S. law and presented "diplomatic identity papers" that the police determined were fraudulent. The men, who later called themselves "diplomats," said they were members of an "indigenous nation" that includes people from "the so-called planet earth" and other planets including Mars and Venus. The police impounded a car with phony diplomatic license plates.

    One of the four, Wilbert Harrington, also known as Shir M. Bey, 27, of Hamilton, N.J., was charged with possessing a controlled dangerous substance with the intent to distribute, obstructing the administration of law, resisting arrest and displaying fraudulent documentation. Harrington arrived in court wearing a fez and demanded that a jury of his peers — several of whom were seated in the courtroom and also dressed in the red felt hats — preside over his case.

    International Indigenous Society Chief Executive Abdul-Ali Muhammad, the leader of the Abannaki Nation, told The Trentonian that the men's identification documents are real and signed by U.S. Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice. After the arrests, Muhammad published a 20-point statement, "Conspiracy on Nation Exposed," which attacked the local police for being ignorant of international law, the Constitution and state law.

    According to law enforcement, the Abannaki Nation first appeared in Philadelphia, where its headquarters is located. Members were discovered in Mercer County, N.J., last October.

    The group's website praises the late Nation of Islam founder Elijah Muhammad and agrees with his view that whites are "a grafted race." According to Abdul-Ali Muhammad, whites live a "toxic existence" because they need animal proteins to offset a deficient "chemical makeup." Because of this defect, whites are a "negative influence" on black people and the earth. Muhammad also believes that AIDS comes from eating meat and dairy products.


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  • 02-22-2011 9:29 PM In reply to

    • Dr Indigo
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    Re: Taxagent, ever heard of the International Indigenous Society

    The existence of Mu'urs in America has been systematially kept out of the public. Their blood line in America runs from the Tutul Xia Amaru Muru. Their had many tribes of Mu'urs. The Abanaki or Abannaki was part of the Wabanaki confederation of which Benjamin Baniker was a decendant. His grandmother was actually a European Moor, but that is another story.

    The American Moor (Moorish American, American Aboriginal) lost the Americas by way of colonization of Portguese, French, British, Spanish, and independently acting outlaws in search of gold, people, and other things of value. 

    The verbage about tax reporting has something to do with Treaties that position Mu'urs as sovereign in America.  It really takes a couple of years of study for people in our time period to even get a clue about what he is talking about. It is best to let the Department of Justice or the IRS handle it, because their higher ups have access to historians and Master Masons. The slave trade happened in reverse and most of the people who were convinced to answer to Black, Negro, Colored, etc., actually are denationalized Mu'urs. They were first called American when they were captured and shipped  aroundr the world for sale. Later, they were called Negros De Terra, and not Negros De Guinea. The actual Stelae that depict them are never shown of TV. Thomas Jefferson points out that there is difference between the Indian and the Aboriginal Indian. Yes, he knew the secret.

    Read Columbus' journal yourself. He was a serious crimminal. Read Lewis and Cark's journal for yourself. they describe what the Choctaw (Washataw) really looked like. Read the Jesuit letters for yourself. they tell you who were here before all the craziness takes place. Check out President Boudinot's "Star in the West" He placed his finger on these people as having to mush in common with the lost tribes of Israel to not be them.

    By the way, Amerigo Vepucci is a made up name. "America" comes from "Amaru kha" from Khans of Mu. No matter what your so-called race is, you will be "pissed off." You will never look at an African American the same ever again when you find out what he does not even know about himself. 

    If you have not noticed, this subject of history is closely related to titles to the land in America. 

    If one is truley interested is knowing truely what happed, it will take some reading. If one were able to read several languages, it will be easier once sources come from somewhere outside of the borders of the United States of American. This goes on and on, but it does not matter if you do not research, you will just believe that 2 minute analysis ( of intentional lie) that so many people pasted  to the initial inquery. 

     

     

  • 02-22-2011 9:51 PM In reply to

    Re: Taxagent, ever heard of the International Indigenous Society

    Dr Indigo:
    This goes on and on, but it does not matter if you do not research, you will just believe that 2 minute analysis ( of intentional lie) that so many people pasted  to the initial inquery. 

    What I posted in response to the initial post as to the tax analysis is accurate and certainly not an "intentional lie" as you claim. Indeed, your post shows you don't know federal tax law at all on this matter and yet that didn't stop you from making the the statement anyway. That you would make such an accusation without knowing me (or the other responders) or understanding tax law tells me something of you, and it's not favorable. Much of your history, even if accurate, really has nothing to do with the question that was asked or the responses to it.

  • 02-22-2011 10:27 PM In reply to

    Re: Taxagent, ever heard of the International Indigenous Society

    Tax... good buddy...

    You take things far too seriously.

    Ok

     

  • 02-22-2011 10:48 PM In reply to

    • LdiJ
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    Re: Taxagent, ever heard of the International Indigenous Society

    harrylime:

    Tax... good buddy...

    You take things far too seriously.

     

    No he doesn't.  People who buy into this garbage get themselves into serious trouble.

  • 02-22-2011 11:10 PM In reply to

    • Dr Indigo
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    • OH
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    Re: Taxagent, ever heard of the International Indigenous Soc...

    Hold your horses there "cowboy." The "of (should be or) intentional lie" or "2 minute analysis" is referring to the article, not your inquiry. Read it again. How can your inquiry be accused of being a 2 minute analysis or intentional lie? It was just an honest question to me. A question can not be a statement or and analysis. Most replied by attaching the "black separatist" article after trying to assist you. You should stand corrected.  Do not start some series of personal arguments based on what is not there. It will be a waste of time. Read the articles that were attached. You will see that they are all the same written by someone reporter who does not have a any background on the subject.   This is where we are suppose to go back and forth with personal attacks and evade the initial inquiry about the society named in the thread. I do not have time for that. About tax law and my lack of knowledge. There is a little thing in the Constitution for the United States of America (1789) that talks about about Treaties made being the law of the land. I think that it has something to do with USC title 26 (and IRC title 26) if the treaty affects taxation. Again, the research reveals this over time.
    Make sure you are under attack the next time you want to be so insulting pilgrim?

  • 02-22-2011 11:59 PM In reply to

    Re: Taxagent, ever heard of the International Indigenous Society

    LdiJ:
    No he doesn't.  People who buy into this garbage get themselves into serious trouble.

    Yeah, but a reply to someone who is a few bricks shy, who was replying to a 1+ year old post?

  • 02-23-2011 5:53 AM In reply to

    Re: Taxagent, ever heard of the International Indigenous Society

    harrylime:
    Yeah, but a reply to someone who is a few bricks shy, who was replying to a 1+ year old post?

    The problem is that you may recognize that someone is a "few bricks shy" but not all do. I've seen a number of people who, for example, have been sucked in by "tax protest" (for lack of a better phrase) sites on the internet only to later find themselves in a very bad legal situation later when the IRS and the state come after them. For that reason, I think it's important to confront those wrong posts when I see them so that others won't get taken in. Unfortunately, those kinds of sites seem in particular to attract less eductated, lower income folks who are among least able to afford the penalties, interest, and other problems that they encounter when the government catches up to them.

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